Preview jTalk

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Pesentation and Data Manipulation

Making the business case for jTalk.
The following preview outlines the key features and benefit analysis of jTalk, incorporating screenshots and example code snippets.

jTalk solves the following critical business problems experienced by all web application developers:


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In previous pages you've learned about the business layer and seen how easy it is to access your data using jTalk. While that is critical, the presentation layer is your link to the visitor. jTalk can present your data in the exact way you want it to come accross. In fact, with over 38 attributes and format options to control the presentation of your data, jTalk is the ideal solution for the presentation layer.

Manipulate Results

jTalk's object-oriented design means that all tags that output data share a common series of attributes and formats. Learn once, apply to any tag. No need to constantly refer to reference material and documentation for the unique behavior of each tag. Instead, apply what you already know to every tag you use.

Attributes:
  Encoding: BREAKS
CODE
CONDITION
HTML
INPUT
JAVASCRIPT
RSS
SMART
SQL
UNICODE
URL
XML
  Format: CAPITALIZE
CURRENCY
DECRYPT
ENCRYPT
FULL
GMT
ISO
LENGTH
LONG
LOWERCASE
MEDIUM
NUMBER
PAD
PERCENT
SHORT4
SHORT
STOPCHAR
TIMESTAMP
TRIM
UNCAPITALIZE
UPPERCASE
  Type: DATE
DATE-ISO
NUMERIC
PASSWORD
TEXT

And, because of jTalk's object-oriented design, fewer tags are required to get the result you desire, reducing overhead, code-bloating and general design obscurity. Consider this example of encoding a column tag in jTalk and encoding a column tag in the Java Standard Tag Library (JSTL).


Typical Custom Tag Approach:
  <str:encodeUrl><jc:expr value="$row.column_name"/></str:encodeUrl>
jTalk Approach:
  <jtalk:column name="column_name" encoding="url"/>

You see above that to do the same task, jTalk requires only one tag while the JSTL required 3, a 200% code savings! Factor those numbers over 100 tags on a typical application page and you can see the results. And, while jTalk used clear tag names everyone can understand, the JSTL usage was simply more complex.

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